Best Roofing Company Colorado, Colorado Springs – Done Right Roofing and Exteriors

Done Right Roofing is one of the premier roofing companies in Colorado Springs. To see why, click here for more information.

Roofing companies in Colorado Springs have a moral obligation to inspect every aspect of a roof.  Not only are we to inspect the roofing tiles for signs of weather related damage but checking the “roof flashing” as well.
Roof shingles do a fantastic job of keeping the weather where it belongs, out of your home.
Done right roofing does all of this and more up!!!

Hello this is Pat and Diane Hernandez and to sink you so much for joining our newsletter endure interest and Done Right Roofing and Exteriors!! We are so excited to be able to take care of all of our clients with quality and integrity.

We have to give you the best service possible for your new roof or repair of your roof!

Please enjoy the book fix it and we look forward to contacting you very soon. We know that you’re excited an anxious to get going on your new project and we are right here for you.
Thanks again and we will contact you very soon!

Get Roofing tips here!

 

J Michael’s Union Ave Pub – Pueblo Colorado

Come meet the folks at J. Michael’s

On union avenue and Pueblo Colorado
The J. Michael’s union avenue pub is the awesome new place to hang out and just get away from life for while. Great Ambiance, food and drink with live entertainment down in the Cavern. The Cavern is a great place for fun activities, perfect for private parties and sports viewing.

Let’s not forgive about their food as they serve up everything from a meat and cheese board wits of thinly sliced roast beef and hot au jus, cheddar cheese, jack cheese and fresh veggies with the dipping sauce. Also on the menu is their variety of fresh Panini Pressed Sandwiches. Also served is J.Michael’s special faves! The Chicago Vinny and The Barracuda.
And holy cow don’t forget the Ice Cold Beer!
Come die and join us for fun food and relaxation a J. Michael’s.

Located at;
325 S. Union Avenue
Pueblo, CO 81003

J. Michael’s ….. it’s a place where you wanna be!

Telephone 719-696-9703
Email us at jmichaelspueblo@aol.com

Get More Customers with Deetslist

Get More Customers with Deetslist

Where are the customers?
A lot of small business owners a particularly irksome problem. They can’t find enough customers. Many small business hours will spend countless hours trying to drum up customers to get sales, but they are always so busy from doing so that they never have time to actually conduct any business. There are several million small businesses that struggle with finding customers on a daily basis. Staying ahead of the competition and discovering that customer edge can be infuriating to small business owners. Finding the best SEO company advertising can be a royal pain in the rear end.
Spinning Our Wheels?
Small business owners try lots of things when they’re trying to find customers online. They get on Facebook, pay Google, buy a website, send out flyers, and try to reach people through message boards relevant to their product. They do just about everything, but they don’t garner as many customers as they could. The reason is that many small business owners are not experts at finding customers online.
What is the Solution?
Deetslist offers a potential solution for small business owners that struggle with advertising online. It is a one-stop shop that gets you listed, designed, and strategized to succeed in every major online marketplace. Deetslist has its hands in every big market on the web. They take your small business and throw it into the ring. There are so many places to get listed that the average small business owner just can’t keep up with them all. There is Google Plus, Google Maps, Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, and business directories too. It can be overwhelming for a small business owner to manage all that themselves. They have enough trouble just keeping up with running their business. It is far better to let the experts handle the advertising and design.

Quality and Affordability

Deetslist is a good company to work with because they understand small businesses. They are composed of small business folks themselves, and they’ve been around for more than 40 years doing all kinds of retail work, sales, IT data, and international networking. They also understand online advertising and marketing. They can take any small business, recognizing its inherent challenges and factors, and turn it into a successful online business.
Deetslist uses the cutting-edge tools to reach social media outlets, carry out website design, position directory lists, integrate sales videos, craft emails and articles, and get your business seen online. The proven strategy is designed to get your business to the top of the results page on Google. Deetslist also offers small business owners invaluable education and training with things like seminars and webinars.

 Learn More

Get Your Business Ranked Now!

Learn How To Run A Great Video Marketing Strategy

The Internet has a lot of ways for a person to become a successful business person. One of the best forms is marketing with videos. Videos that are relevant to your organization’s ideals, while also providing an entertaining message for the viewers, are capable of attracting numerous waves of network traffic. The tips you’re about to read will help you.

You can stay close to your customers by using video marketing. You could ask the people watching your videos to send you ideas or questions that you can make short web shows about every week. If possible, offer a prize or incentive to customers whose questions were used in the clip.

Use other people such as guest speakers on your site and in your videos. As interesting as you might be, your viewers will really appreciate seeing a fresh new face. Make sure that whoever you have in your videos reflects the kind of message you want to send to your viewers.

Find the right person for the video. Perhaps you are not as comfortable in front of the camera as you need to be. Speak to your employees, or perhaps your friends, to find someone who can be an effective cheerleader for your company. This will enhance the promotion of the product and get more people to view.

A great beginning video marketing tips is to pick great video titles. The best titles will bring in new viewers. They help spark interest in the content that follows. Use creative, relevant titles on all of your videos.

A product review video is a great way to promote a product. Show how to set up or demonstrate the uses of your products. Discuss each feature and how it works. Mention any options that are available and don’t forget warrantee information. Video reviews show your market why your product is the one to buy. Get started with video marketing and watch your sales increase.

Don’t only rely on videos in your marketing campaign. They are great marketing tools, however, they should not replace your other marketing tactics. Videos should not replace content creation like article writing or blogging. Videos should simply be used to enhance the content in your marketing campaign and to build up your link portfolio.

Some of the most effective ways to gain an audience for your videos will be by using ads in social media or QR codes to direct people to yours videos. People who see these advertisements will already have the means (and likely the time) to watch the video. If they like it, they can instantly share the link with a friend, giving your business’s video yet one more exposure!

Start off in the middle of the action. Don’t start by saying, “Hello, I’m so-and-so” or you’ll lose the viewer instantly. If you plan to run with the bulls, start the video while you’re running! If you make the viewer do a second take, they won’t move on to the next video.

You can reach far and wide using video marketing. Unlike other marketing campaigns that only affect a small area, video marketing can be seen globally. Anyone who owns a computer or mobile device can view a video. You can head a good marketing campaign with all of the information you have read here.

Do you really need A/B testing?

A/B testing is an internet marketing standard. In order to
optimize response rates, you compare one page against another.
You run with the page that gives you the best response rates.

But anyone who has tried A/B testing will know that whilst it
sounds simple in concept, it can be problematic in execution.
For example, it can be difficult to determine if what you’re
seeing is a tangible difference in customer behaviour or simply
a result of chance. Is A/B testing an appropriate choice in all
cases? Or is it best suited to specific applications? Does A/B
testing obscure what customers really want?

In this article, we’ll look at some of the gotchas for those
new to A/B testing.

1. Insufficient Sample Size

You set up test. You’ve got one page featuring call to action A
and one page featuring call to action B. You enable your PPC
campaign and leave it running for a day.

When you stop the test, you’ve found call-to-action A converted
at twice the rate of call-to-action B. So call-to-action A is
the winner and we should run with it, and eliminate option B.

But this would be a mistake.

The sample size may be insufficient. If we only tested one
hundred clicks, we might get a significant difference in
results between two pages, but that change doesn’t show up when
we get to 1,000 clicks. In fact, the result may even be
reversed!

So, how do we determine a sample size that is statistically
significant? This excellent
article explains the maths. However, there are various
online
sample size calculators that will do the calculations for
you, including Evan’s. Most A/B tracking tools will include
sample size calculators, but it’s a good idea to understand
what they’re calculating, and how, to ensure the accuracy of
your tests.

In short, make sure you’ve tested enough of the audience to
determine a trend.

2. Collateral Damage

We might want to test a call to action metric. We want to test
the number of people who click on the “find out more” link on a
landing page. We find that a lot more people click on this link
we use the term “find out more” than if we use the term “buy
now”.

Great, right?

But what if the conversion rate for those who actually make a
purchase falls as a result? We achieved higher click-thrus on
one landing page at the expense of actual sales.

This is why it’s important to be clear about the end goal when
designing and executing tests. Also, ensure we look at the
process as a whole, especially when we’re chopping the process
up into bits for testing purposes. Does a change in one place
affect something else further down the line?

In this example, you might A/B test the landing page whilst
keeping an eye on your total customer numbers deeming the
change effective only if customer numbers also rise. If your
aim was only to increase click-thru, say to boost quality
scores, then the change was effective.

3. What, Not Why

In the example above, we know the “what”. We changed the
wording of a call-to-action link, and we achieved higher click
thru’s, although we’re still in the dark as to why. We’re also
in the dark as to why the change of wording resulted in fewer
sales.

Was it because we attracted more people who were information
seekers? Were buyers confused about the nature of the site? Did
visitors think they couldn’t buy from us? Were they price
shoppers who wanted to compare price information up front?

We don’t really know.

But that’s good, so long as we keep asking questions. These
types of questions lead to more ideas for A/B tests. By turning
testing into an ongoing process, supported by asking more and
hopefully better questions, we’re more likely to discover a
whole range of “why’s”.

4. Small Might Be A Problem

If you’re a small company competing directly with big
companies, you may already be on the back foot when it comes to
A/B testing.

It’s clear that its very modularity can cause problems. But
what about in cases where the number of tests that can be run
at once is low? While A/B testing makes sense on big websites
where you can run hundreds of tests per day and have hundreds
of thousands of hits, only a few offers can be tested at one
time in cases like direct mail. The variance that these tests
reveal is often so low that any meaningful statistical
analysis is impossible.

Put simply, you might not have the traffic to generate
statistically significant results. There’s no easy way around
this problem, but the answer may lay in
getting tricky with the maths.

Experimental design massively and deliberately increases the
amount of variance in direct marketing campaigns. It lets
marketers project the impact of many variables by testing
just a few of them. Mathematical formulas use a subset of
combinations of variables to represent the complexity of all
the original variables. That allows the marketing
organization to more quickly adjust messages and offers and,
based on the responses, to improve marketing effectiveness
and the company’s overall economics

Another thing to consider is that if you’re certain the bigger
company is running A/B tests, and achieving good results, then
“steal” their landing page*. Take their ideas for landing pages
and use that as a test against your existing pages. *Of course,
you can’t really steal their landing page, but you can be
“influenced by” their approach.

What your competitors do is often a good starting point for
your own tests. Try taking their approach and refine it.

5. Might There Be A Better Way?

Are there alternatives to A/B testing?

Some swear by the Multi Armed
Bandit methodology:

The multi-armed bandit problem takes its terminology from a
casino. You are faced with a wall of slot machines, each with
its own lever. You suspect that some slot machines pay out
more frequently than others. How can you learn which machine
is the best, and get the most coins in the fewest trials?
Like many techniques in machine learning, the simplest
strategy is hard to beat. More complicated techniques are
worth considering, but they may eke out only a few hundredths
of a percentage point of performance.

Then again…..

What multi-armed bandit algorithm does is that it
aggressively (and greedily) optimizes for currently best
performing variation, so the actual worse performing versions
end up receiving very little traffic (mostly in the
explorative 10% phase). This little traffic means when you
try to calculate statistical significance, there’s still a
lot of uncertainty whether the variation is “really” worse
performing or the current worse performance is due to random
chance. So, in a multi-armed bandit algorithm, it takes a lot
more traffic to declare statistical significance as compared
to simple randomization of A/B testing. (But, of course, in a
multi-armed bandit campaign, the average conversion rate is
higher).

Multivariate testing may be suitable if you’re testing a
combination of variables, as opposed to just one i.e.

Product Image: Big vs. Medium vs Small

Price Text Style: Bold vs Normal

Price Text Color: Blue vs. Black vs. Red

There would be 3x2x3 different versions to test.

The problem with multivariate tests is they can get complicated
pretty quickly and require a lot of traffic to produce
statistically significant results. One advantage of
multivariate testing over A/B testing is that it can tell you
which part of the page is most influential. Was it a graphic? A
headline? A video? If you’re testing a page using an A/B test,
you won’t know. Multivariate testing will tell you which page
sections influence the conversion rate and which don’t.

6. Methodology Is Only One Part Of The Puzzle

So is A/B testing worthwhile? Are the alternatives better?

The methodology we choose will only be as good as the test
design. If tests are poorly designed, then the maths, the
tests, the data and the software tools won’t be much use.

To
construct good tests, you should first take a high level
view:

Start the test by first asking yourself a question. Something
on the lines of, “Why is the engagement rate of my site lower
than that of the competitors…..Collect information about your
product from customers before setting up any big test. If you
plan to test your tagline, run a quick survey among your
customers asking how they would define your product.

Secondly, consider the limits of testing. Testing can be a bit
of a heartless exercise. It’s cold. We can’t really test how
memorable and how liked one design is over the other, and
typically have to go by instinct on some questions. Sometimes,
certain designs just work for our audience, and other designs
don’t. How do we test if we’re winning not just business, but
also hearts and minds?

Does it mean we really understand our customers if they click
this version over that one? We might see how they react to an
offer, but that doesn’t mean we understand their desires and
needs. If we’re getting click-backs most of the time, then it’s
pretty clear we don’t understand the visitors. Changing a
graphic here, and wording there, isn’t going to help if the
underlying offer is not what potential customers want. No
amount of testing ad copy will sell a pink train.

The understanding of customers is gained in part by tests, and
in part by direct experience with customers and the market
we’re in. Understanding comes from empathy. From asking
questions. From listening to, and understanding, the answers.
From knowing what’s good, and bad, about your competitors. From
providing options. From open communication channels. From
reassuring people. You’re probably armed with this information
already, and that information is highly useful when it comes to
constructing effective tests.

Do you really need A/B testing? Used well, it can markedly
improve and hone offers. It isn’t a magic bullet. Understanding
your audience is the most important thing. Google, a company
that uses testing extensively, seem to be most vulnerable when
it comes to areas that require a more intuitive understanding
of people. Google Glass is a prime example of
failing to understand social context. Apple, on the other
hand, were driven more by an intuitive approach. Jobs: “We
built [the Mac] for ourselves. We were the group of people who
were going to judge whether it was great or not. We weren’t
going to go out and do market research”

A/B testing is can work wonders, just so long as it isn’t used
as a substitute for understanding people.

Have an incredible day!

Mike

Want the best Marketer for your business Go to http://blog.deetslist.com

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Google Places, Local SEO & AdWords

Last October Vendran Tomic wrote a
guide for local SEO which has since become one of the more
popular pages on our site, so we decided to follow up with a
QnA on some of the latest changes in local search.

Local Ants.

Q: Google appears to have settled their
monopolistic abuse charges in Europe. As part of that
settlement they have to list 3 competing offers in their result
set from other vertical databases. If Google charges for the
particular type of listing then these competitors compete in an
ad auction, whereas if the vertical is free those clicks to
competitors are free. How long do we have until Google’s local
product has a paid inclusion element to it?

A: Local advertising market is huge. It’s a
market that Google still hasn’t mastered. It’s a market still
dominated by IYP platforms.

Since search in general is stagnant, Google will be looking to
increase their share of the market.

That was obvious to anyone who was covering Google’s attempt to
acquire Groupon since social couponing is a local marketing
phenomenon mostly.

Their new dashboard is not only more stable with a slicker
interface, but also capable of facilitating any paid inclusion
module.

I would guess that Google will not wait a long time to launch a
paid inclusion product or something similar, since they want to
keep their shareholders happy.

Q: In the past there have been fiascos with
things like local page cross-integration with Google+. How
“solved” are these problems, and how hard is it to isolate
these sorts of issues from other potential issues?

A: Traditionally, Google had the most trouble
with their “local” products. Over the years, they were losing
listings, reviews, merging listings, duplicating them etc.
Someone called their attempts “a train wreck at the junction.”
They were also notoriously bad with providing guidance that
would help local businesses navigate the complexity of the
environment Google created.

Google has also faced some branding challenges – confusing even
the most seasoned local search professionals with their
branding.

Having said that, things have been changing for the better.
Google has introduced phone support which is, I must say, very
useful. In addition, the changes they made in a way they deal
with local data made things more stable.

However, I’d still say that Google’s local products are their
biggest challenge.

Q: Yelp just had strong quaterly results and
Yahoo! has recently added a knowledge-graph like pane to their
search results. How important is local search on platforms away
from Google? How aligned are the various local platforms on
ranking criteria?

A: Just like organic search is mostly about
two functions – importance and relevance, local search is about
location prominence, proximity and relevance (where location
prominence is an equivalent to importance in general SEO).

All local search platforms have ranking factors that are based
on these principles.

The only thing that’s different is what they consider ranking
signals and the way they place on each. For example, to rank
high in Yahoo! Local, one needs to be very close to the
centroid of the town, have something in the title of their
business that matches the query of the search and have a few
reviews.

Google is more sophisticated, but the principles are the same.

The less sophisticated local search platforms use less signals
in their algorithm, and are usually geared more towards
proximity as a ranking signal.

It’s also important to note that local search functions as a
very interconnected ecosystem, and that changes made in order
to boost visibility in one platform, might hurt you in another.

Q: There was a Google patent where they
mentioned using driving directions to help as a relevancy
signal. And Bing recently invested in and licensed data from
Foursquare. Are these the sorts of signals you see taking
weight from things like proximity over time?

A: I see these signals becoming/increasing in
importance over time as they would be a useful ranking signal.
However, to Google, local search is also about location
sensitivity, and these signals will probably not be used
outside of this context.

If you read a patent named “Methods And Systems For Improving A
Search Ranking Using Location Awareness” (Amit Singhal is one
of the inventors), you will see that Google, in fact, is aware
that people have different sensitivities fo different types of
services/queries. You don’t necessarily care where your plumber
will come from, but you do care where the pizza places are
where you search for pizza in your location.

I don’t see driving directions as a signal ever de-throning
proximity, because proximity is closer to the nature of the
offline/online interaction.

Q: There are many different local directories
which are highly relevant to local, while there are also
vertical specific directories which might be tied to travel
reviews or listing doctors. Some of these services (say like
OpenTable) also manage bookings and so on. How important is it
that local businesses “spread around” their marketing efforts?
When does it make sense to focus deeply on a specific platform
or channel vs to promote on many of them?

A: This is a great question, Aaron! About 5
years ago, I believed that the only true game in town for any
local business is Google. This was because, at that time, I
wasn’t invested in proper measurement of outcomes and metrics
such as cost of customer acquisition, lead acqusition etc.

Local businesses, famous for their lack of budgets, should
always “give” vertical platforms a try, even IYP type sites.
This is why:

one needs to decrease dependance on Google because it’s an
increasingly fickle channel of traffic acquisition (Penguin and
Panda didn’t spare local websites),

sometimes, those vertical websites can produce great
returns. I was positively surprised by the number of
inquiries/leads one of our law firm clients got from a well
known vertical platform.

using different marketing channels and measuring the right
things can improve your marketing skills.

Keep in mind, basics need to be covered first: data
aggregators, Google Places, creating a
professional/usable/persuasive website, as well as developing a
measurement model.

Q: What is the difference between
incentivizing a reasonable number of reviews & being so
aggressive that something is likely to be flagged as spam? How
do you draw the line with trying to encourage customer reviews?

A: Reviews and review management have always
been tricky, as well as important. We know two objective things
about reviews:

consumers care about reviews when making a purchase and

reviews are important for your local search visibility.

Every local search/review platform worth its weight in salt
will have a policy in place discouraging incentivizing and
“buying” reviews. They will enforce this policy using
algorithms or humans. We all know that.

Small and medium sized businesses make a mistake of trying to
get as many reviews as humanly possible, and direct them to one
or two local search platforms. Here, they make two mistakes:

1. they’re driven by a belief that one needs a huge number of
reviews on Google and
2. one needs to direct all their review efforts at Google.

This behavior forces them to be flagged algorithmically or
manually. Neither Google nor Yelp want you to solicit reviews.

However, if you change your approach from aggressively asking
for reviews to a survey-based approach, you should be fine.

What do I mean by that?

A survey-based approach means you solicit your customers’
opinions on different services/products to improve your
operations – and then ask them to share their opinion on the
web while giving them plenty of choices.

This approach will get you much further than mindlessly begging
people for reviews and sending them to Google.

The problem with clear distinction between the right and wrong
way in handling reviews, as far as Google goes, lies in their
constant changing of guidelines regarding reviews.

Things to remember are: try to get reviews on plenty of sites,
while surveying your customers and never get too aggressive.
Slow and steady wins the race.

Q: On many local searches people are now
getting carouseled away from generic searches toward branded
searches before clicking through, and then there is keyword(not
provided) on top of that. What are some of the more cost
efficient ways a small business can track & improve their
ranking performance when so much of the performance data is
hidden/disconnected?

A: Are you referring to ranking in Maps or
organic part of the results? I’m asking because Google doesn’t
blend anymore.

Q: I meant organic search

A: OK. My advice has always been to not obsess
over rankings, but over customer acquisition numbers, leads,
lifetime customer value etc.

However, rankings are objectively a very important piece of the
puzzle. Here are my suggestions when it comes to more cost
efficient ways to track and improve ranking performance:

When it comes to tracking, I’d use Advanced Web Ranking
(AWR) or Authority Labs, both of which are not very expensive.

Improving ranking performance is another story. Local
websites should be optimized based on the same principles that
would work for any site (copy should be written for conversion,
pages should be focused on narrow topics, titles should be
written for clickthrough rates etc).

On the link building side of things, I’d suggest taking
care of data aggregators first as a very impactful, yet cost
effective strategy. Then, I would go after vertical platforms
that link directly to a website, that have profiles chockfull
of structured data. I would also make sure to join relevant
industry and business associations, and generally go after
links that only a real local business can get – or that come as
a result of broader marketing initiatives. For example, one can
organize events in the offline world that can result in links
and citations, effectively increasing their search visibility
without spending too much.

Q: If you are a local locksmith, how do you
rise above the spam which people have publicly complained about
for at least 5 years straight now?

A: If I were a local locksmith, I would
seriously consider moving my operations close to the centroid
of my town/city. I would also make sure my business data across
the web is highly consistent.

In addition, I would make sure to facilitate getting reviews on
many platforms. If this wouldn’t be enough (as it often isn’t
enough in many markets), I would be public about Google’s
inability to handle locksmiths spam in my town – using their
forums, and any other medium.

Q: In many cities do you feel the potential
ROI would be high enough to justify paying for downtown real
estate then? Or would you suggest having a mailing related
address or such?

A: The ROI of getting a legitimate downtown
address would greatly depend on customer lifetime value. For
example, if I were a personal injury attorney in a major city,
I would definitely consider opening a small office near a
center of my city/town.

Another thing to consider would be the search radius/location
sensitivity. If the location sensitivity for a set of keywords
is high, I would be more inclined to invest in a downtown
office.

I wouldn’t advocate PO boxes or virtual offices, since Google
is getting more aggressive about weeding those out.

Q: Google recently started supporting
microformats for things like hours of operation, phone numbers,
and menus. How important is it for local businesses to use
these sorts of features?

A: It is not a crucial ranking factor, and is
unlikely to be any time in the near future. However, Google
tends to reward businesses that embrace their new features – at
least in local search. I would definitely recommend embracing
microformats in local search.

Q: As a blogger I’ve noticed an increase in
comment spam with NAP information in it. Do you see Google
eventually penalizing people for that? Is this likely to turn
into yet another commonplace form of negative SEO?

A: This is a difficult question. Knowing how
Google operates, it’s possible they start penalizing that
practice. However, I don’t see that type of spam being
particularly effective.

Most blogs cannot do a lot to enhance the location prominence.
But if that turned into a negative SEO avenue, I would say that
Google wouldn’t handle it well (based on their track records).

Q: Last year you wrote a popular guide to
local search. What major changes have happened to the ecosystem
since then? Would you change any of the advice you gave back
then? Or has local search started to become more stable
recently?

A: There weren’t huge changes in the local
ecosystem. Google has made a lot of progress in transferring
accounts to the new dashboard, improving the Bulk upload
function. They also changed their UX slightly.

Moz entered the local search space with their Moz Local
product.

Q: When doing a local SEO campaign, how much
of the workload tends to be upfront stuff versus ongoing
maintenance work? For many campaigns is a one-off effort enough
to last for a significant period of time? How do you determine
the best approach for a client in terms of figuring out the mix
of upfront versus maintenance and how long it will take results
to show and so on?

A: This largely depends on the objective of
the campaign, the market and the budget. There are verticals
where local Internet marketing is extremely competitive, and
tends to be a constant battle.

Some markets, on the other hand, are easy and can largely be a
one-off thing. For example, if you’re a plumber or an
electrician in a small town with a service area limited to that
town, you really don’t need much maintenance, if any.

However, if you are a roofing company that wants to be a market
leader in greater Houston, TX your approach has to be much
different.

The upfront work tends to be more intense if the business has
NAP inconsistencies, never did any Internet marketing and
doesn’t excel at offline marketing.

If you’re a brand offline and know to tie your offline and
online marketing efforts, you will have a much easier time
getting the most out of the web.

In most smaller markets, the results can be seen in a span of
just a few months. More competitive markets, in my experience,
require more time and a larger investment.

Q: When does it make sense for a local
business to DIY versus hiring help? What tools do you recommend
they use if they do it themselves?

A: If local business owner is in a position
where doing local Internet marketing is their highest value
activity, it would make sense to do it themselves.

However, more often than not, this is not the case even for the
smallest of businesses. Being successful in local Internet
marketing in a small market is not that difficult. But it does
come with a learning curve and a cost in time.

Having said that, if the market is not that competitive, taking
care of data aggregators, a few major local search platforms
and acquisition of a handful of industry links would do the
trick.

For data aggregators, one might go directly to them or use a
tool such as UBM or Moz Local.

To dig for citations, Whitespark’s citation tool is pretty good
and not that expensive.

Q: The WSJ recently published a fairly
unflatering article about some of the larger local search firms
which primarily manage AdWords for 10’s of thousands of clients
& rely on aggressive outbound marketing to offset high
levels of churn. Should a small business consider paid search
& local as being separate from one another or part of the
same thing? If someone hires help on these fronts, where’s the
best place to find responsive help?

A: “Big box” local search companies were
always better about client acquisition than performance. It
always seemed as if performance wasn’t an integral part of
their business model.

However, small businesses cannot take that approach when it
comes to performance. Generally speaking, the more web is
connected to business, the better of a small business is. This
means that a local Internet marketing strategy should start
with business objectives.

Everyone should ask themselves 2 questions:
1. What’s my lifetime customer value?
2. How much can I afford to spend on acquiring a customer?

Every online marketing endeavor should be judged through this
lens. This means greater integration.

Q: What are some of the best resources people
can use to get the fundamentals of local search & to keep
up with the changing search landscape?

A: Luckily for everyone, blogosphere in local
search is rich in useful information. I would definitely
recommend Mike
Blumenthal’s blog, Andrew Shotland’s Local SEO Guide, Linda Buquet’s
forum, Nyagoslav
Zhekov, Mary
Bowling and of course, the
Local U blog.

Vedran Tomic is a member of SEOBook and founder of Local Ants LLC, a local
internet marketing agency. Please feel free to use the comments
below to ask any local search questions you have, as Vedran
will be checking in periodically to answer them over the next
couple days.

Have an incredible day!

Mike

Want the best Marketer for your business Go to http://blog.deetslist.com

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Pueblo Colorado – Best SEO Company Deetslist

Get More Customers with Deetslist

Where are the customers?
A lot of small business owners a particularly irksome problem. They can’t find enough customers. Many small business hours will spend countless hours trying to drum up customers to get sales, but they are always so busy from doing so that they never have time to actually conduct any business. There are several million small businesses that struggle with finding customers on a daily basis. Staying ahead of the competition and discovering that customer edge can be infuriating to small business owners. Finding the best SEO company advertising can be a royal pain in the rear end.
Spinning Our Wheels?
Small business owners try lots of things when they’re trying to find customers online. They get on Facebook, pay Google, buy a website, send out flyers, and try to reach people through message boards relevant to their product. They do just about everything, but they don’t garner as many customers as they could. The reason is that many small business owners are not experts at finding customers online.
What is the Solution?
Deetslist offers a potential solution for small business owners that struggle with advertising online. It is a one-stop shop that gets you listed, designed, and strategized to succeed in every major online marketplace. Deetslist has its hands in every big market on the web. They take your small business and throw it into the ring. There are so many places to get listed that the average small business owner just can’t keep up with them all. There is Google Plus, Google Maps, Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, and business directories too. It can be overwhelming for a small business owner to manage all that themselves. They have enough trouble just keeping up with running their business. It is far better to let the experts handle the advertising and design.

Quality and Affordability

Deetslist is a good company to work with because they understand small businesses. They are composed of small business folks themselves, and they’ve been around for more than 40 years doing all kinds of retail work, sales, IT data, and international networking. They also understand online advertising and marketing. They can take any small business, recognizing its inherent challenges and factors, and turn it into a successful online business.
Deetslist uses the cutting-edge tools to reach social media outlets, carry out website design, position directory lists, integrate sales videos, craft emails and articles, and get your business seen online. The proven strategy is designed to get your business to the top of the results page on Google. Deetslist also offers small business owners invaluable education and training with things like seminars and webinars.

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Pueblo Colorado – Jeff Divelbiss – Jones-Healy

Jeff Divelbiss - Pueblo Colorado

Jeff Divelbiss – Pueblo Colorado

ABOUT JEFF
Your HOMETOWN Pressure FREE REALTOR
The Pueblo Real Estate Agent you have been looking for…Motivated and committed with over 9 years of buying and selling experience. My philosophy has always been pressure free and patience, allowing my clients to enjoy their buying and selling experience. As a committee member of Pueblo’s Real Estate Young Professionals Network, I strive to see my community and hometown grow and flourish. I believe there is no better place to start your career, grow a family, or sit back and enjoy what Pueblo has to offer. Each Pueblo community has its own unique characteristics and I am your real estate guide to finding YOUR perfect fit!

Our Jones-Healy office is celebrating 80 years in business! Jones-Healy, Inc. Realtors, is the “Oldest”, largest full-service, locally owned “Independent” real estate company in Pueblo and Southern Colorado, providing a complete range of both commercial and residential services. We are a Member of Leading Real Estate Companies of the World. Focusing on real estate opportunities in Pueblo and Southern Colorado has been a tradition at Jones-Healy Realtors since 1934.

Colorado Springs Colorado – Done Right Roofing And Exteriors

About Us

Patrick and Diane Hernandez - Done Right Roofing

Patrick and Diane Hernandez – Done Right Roofing

About Done Right Roofing and Exteriors

Done Right Roofing and Exteriors was founded in September 2011 by Patrick Hernandez; a 3rd generation, former Union Roofer, with over 23 years of experience. Work performed in the Union Roofing Industry was only based on government structures, all governed by OSHA quality control. So we felt why not take that same high standard quality and bring it to the residential community. That way EVERY project we perform is of government quality. We are confident that you will be very satisfied with the services that we offer. Done Right Roofing and Exteriors is family-owned and operated right here in Colorado Springs, CO. Quality and safety are our main goals. Other companies may offer similar services, but our services are the best, and comes with a personal touch.

Pueblo Colorado – Tortured Souls Tattoo

 

Pueblo Colorado _Tortured Souls Tattoo

Pueblo Colorado _Tortured Souls Tattoo

Tortured Souls Tattoo

has been serving Pueblo, and surrounding areas for almost 10 years. Owner/Operator Brittney Miles has been in the tattoo industry for over 10 years. When you walk in to our shop you’ll immediately recognize our adherence to cleanliness as we follow strict health code regulations and guidelines. With a talented staff that brings experience to the table, a pleasant and friendly atmosphere is created! Tortured Souls Tattoo offers every type of tattooing. Let it be Realistic Portraits, Pin ups, Japanese, Traditional and much more. Tortured Souls Tattoo is the tattoo shop for you! Not only are we able to design specific requests for our clients, but we also specialize in custom designs. Whether if it’s your first tattoo or your too many to count, Tortured Souls Tattoo can make it happen in ways only you can only imagine. Feel free to come by and browse our artwork, talk to our artists and see what Tortured Souls Tattoo can do for you. Everything is `single use’. This includes the pigments used, gloves, protective barriers as well as the tubes and needles that are discarded into a sharps container immediately after every tattoo… right before your eyes! Looking for high quality, affordable tattoos in a safe, clean, and friendly environment? Look no further. Tortured Souls Tattoo is setting a trend by creating a lifestyle concept, not just a tattoo…